STEM

Beating Cabin Fever with Cooking

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It’s winter. It’s cold. There’s no snow to play in, or the kids are tired of playing in the snow. What can you do to beat Cabin Fever? Try cooking! Cooking with your kids is fun, healthy, AND educational! It is sometimes said that “Cooking is science (or math) for hungry people!”  

Think about all the science and math your children are observing and using when cooking. There’s the math of measuring out the ingredients. For an extra challenge you ...

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Raising Mini Physicists

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When most of you think about learning physics, where does your memory take you? Do you automatically think of physics class in high school or maybe an experiment in middle school? Whether or not we realize it, we all grew up experimenting with physics in and out of the classroom. For instance, did you have a Slinky® when you were a child? This is a toy that helps you intuitively learn physics. My brother and I each had a Slinky® ...

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Meet Artist Claire Reynes

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By: Claire Reynes

When people meet an artist one of the first things they usually ask them is, “what materials do you use?” For a long time I didn’t have an exact answer to that question. I love making art and I love teaching art but I really didn’t have one medium that I felt connected to. During my junior year of college that all changed when I studied abroad in Cortona, Italy through the University of Georgia-Athens art program. It ...

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Learning to Reason Through Play

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In the grand scheme of things there are two big categories when it comes to learning; academic learning and intellectual learning. Neither of these categories stands alone, they are interdependent and both are critical for a lifetime of learning. Critical thinking skills fall under the umbrella of intellectual learning and are a big focus for us here at DCM.

The research is undeniable, the best way to develop critical thinking skills ...

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AWEsome Water

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The day has finally arrived! Our new AWEsome Water exhibit is open! Many years of planning and hard work have gone into the dreaming up and creation of this exhibit area. We know that water is naturally alluring and believe that our new exhibit components will stimulate the curiosity of all ages and that natural drive to answer those “what will happen if…” questions that set the stage for a lifetime of engaged learning.

One of the new additions ...

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Splish & Splash to Critical Thinking: Water Play

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If you have been to the Museum in the past few weeks I am sure you have noticed that our water exhibit is under construction. If you come visit in the next few weeks you might be able to catch a sneak peek of the instillation of our new water exhibit, AWEsome Water. Many visitors may be sad to be without water but we promise it will be worth the wait.

Few children can resist the draw to play in water, ...

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Slime, Oobleck, Silly Putty, and All Things Sensory!

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It is not uncommon to hear people mention that they bring their little ones to DCM to engage in messy activities. We get it, messy activities require a lot of work, so we are happy to provide those opportunities here as this natural drive to do messy things actually carries developmental significance.

So why is it that all things messy tend to act like child magnets? Young children in particular are natural born scientists driven by the need to understand ...

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Physics on Board

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Gravity, friction, inertia, and momentum. These are the physics concepts that can be explored with young children using a 4-to-5-foot board, a stack of books or bricks, and things you probably have around the house. Sound daunting? It’s really not. As a significant adult in your child’s life, you are a teacher. But you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to experiment and play with physics (but bravo if you are!).

Gather up some balls. Golf balls, practice golf balls, ...

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Try, Try Again

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I often talk in my blogs about how we intentionally create safe spaces for children to fail in order to support the development of persistence and problem solving skills in regards to older children. Today I would like to shift the focus to our youngest visitors, from birth to 3 years old, who need a different type of support in developing the capacity to stick with something that is challenging, and cope with frustration.Learning with ...</p><a class= Continue Reading →

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